Targeting a Watery Invader at Lake Taghkanic

Thanks to a “hands-on” kayak mission against invasive water chestnut this summer at Lake Taghkanic State Park, this popular lake ought to be clearer of these aquatic invaders for next paddling season. And timing is critical in dealing with water chestnuts, floating plants which can rapidly spread to create dense patches that can clog a … Continue reading Targeting a Watery Invader at Lake Taghkanic

Big Hopes for Little “Army” in Parks’ Fight against Hemlock Invaders

As the third most common tree in New York, hemlocks fill our forests and are found in many New York State Parks. Located along hiking trails, streams, gorges, campsites, and lake shores, the evergreens can live to be hundreds of years old, providing vital ecosystem services and supporting unique habitats. In addition to providing homes … Continue reading Big Hopes for Little “Army” in Parks’ Fight against Hemlock Invaders

A View from the Treetops: life as a forest health specialist

My name is Abigail Pierson and I am a Forest Health Specialist for NYS Parks. The scope of my work covers almost all the state parks in the western half of New York state, making each week always something new and exciting. My week begins with the usual desk work of contacting park managers and … Continue reading A View from the Treetops: life as a forest health specialist

Invasive Species Spotlight – Elongate Hemlock Scale

Name: Elongate Hemlock Scale (Fiorinia externa Ferris) Origin: Native to China and Japan and was first observed in New York City in 1905. It is believed that it was unintentionally introduced from Japan. NYS Presence: Elongate hemlock scale (EHS) is present throughout the state, with the highest density within a 185 mile radius of New York … Continue reading Invasive Species Spotlight – Elongate Hemlock Scale

Invasive Species Spotlight – Kudzu

Name: Kudzu (Pueraria montana) Origin: Kudzu was first introduced to the southern US in the late 1800’s as an ornamental plant to shade porches. In the early 1900s, farmers were encouraged to plant kudzu for erosion control and in the 1930’s the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) planted thousands of acres of it along hillsides for … Continue reading Invasive Species Spotlight – Kudzu