Tag Archives: winter sports

Enjoy Winter – Get the Kids Outside

It’s cold outside, it takes forever to get the kids bundled up and out the door. Is it worth all the trouble? You bet! You don’t need a lot of planning, just a few tips and tricks to encourage kids – and you – to enjoy the outdoors in winter.

Bundle Up

Look for hats and hoods that are not just fun or cute, but that are also warm and comfy (and don’t keep falling over their eyes). Warm and waterproof boots, mittens – not gloves – to keep those fingers warm, and a scarf if it is really nippy or windy out. For the little ones, mitten clips or strings keeps them from getting lost. If it is sunny, don’t forget to apply some sunscreen on the face and ears, and fair eyed kids and adults may want sunglasses.

Build a Snow Sculpture

We all hope for snow! Building snow people or forts or animals, small or large is always fun. My father once built us a snow duck we could sit on. Look for leaves, sticks, and berries on the ground to decorate your snow sculpture with.

Let’s Go Sledding! Snowshoeing! Hiking!

Many parks have places for sledding. Pick the size of slope that is right for the kids and a location without trees or other hazards. Likewise, choose the right size route for cross-country skiing, snowshoeing or hiking and make it fun. If there is no snow, there are still lots of places to hike. Avoid icy trails. You can find flat trails around a lake or campground or on bike paths that are good for beginner snowshoeing and hiking with or without snow. Some of the nature centers even have snowshoes to borrow. Start small and work up to a longer outing. Older kids may enjoy the challenge of a longer day out; just remember to bring lunch and water and plan for some stops.

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Learn to ski! Photo by Anneli Salo, accessed from Wikicommons

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Sledding is always fun.

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Out for a hike.

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Accessed from Wikicommons

Look for Animals Kids are good at spotting animals and animal tracks. Stop and look and listen for squirrels and birds in the bushes and trees. You don’t need to be able to identify what animal it is, just take the time to look. Where do the tracks go? Are they big or small? What kind of animal do you think it might be? Common animal tracks to see in the winter at the park are squirrels, dogs, birds, snowshoe hare, and deer.

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Chickadees will sometimes come to a little birdseed in your outstretched hand.

Need a little help? Take part in a park-led activity like a snowshoe hike or ice fishing day.

Be an Explorer 

There are all kinds of cool things to see in winter. Take the time to look around, it’s amazing what you can find. Some kids are naturally curious, others may need a little encouragement or direction to get started. If so, make a game out of it like a scavenger hunt for shapes, colors and/or things. Try this: find a sign of 1 animal; a place where an animal might hide; the shape of the letters U,V,X,Y; something green, something blue.

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Ski tracks form nice V’s

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Do you see a ‘U’?, photo by Julie Lundgren

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A hollow tree trunk is a place animals could hide, photo by Julie Lundgren
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Light green lichen decorates this hemlock log, photo by Julie Lundgren

 

Take a Break – Bring a Treat

Bring a little treat and stop outside on a log or a bench to have a snack and water.  Tangerines, raisins, apple slices, pretzels, nuts are some healthy choices but a little chocolate or a cookie doesn’t hurt. Bringing a thermos and having hot chocolate or tea to have outside seems really special after sledding or midway through a hike or ski.19_kid smiling with snowball

Know when to come indoors

If it is really cold or windy, pay attention to signs of getting too cold. Noses, ears, and fingers can easily get cold and frostbite may happen when the temperatures drop. Get out of the cold if any of you can’t feel your fingers or toes or start shivering. And plan your outing so you are done well before the daylight dims, as temperatures drop when the sun goes down.20_winter_painting2_JLundgrenPost by Julie Lundgren, NY Natural Heritage Program.

More outdoor fun ideas:

Appalachian Mountain Club, 20 Outdoor Activities Kids Can Do Anywhere

New York State Dept. of Conservation Conservationist for Kids, Become An Outdoor Explorer

New York State Dept. of Conservation Conservationist for Kids, Become a Winter Wildlife Detective!

Ready, Set, Bait

One of the many benefits of living in the northeast is the variety of winter recreational opportunities that are afforded to us. One of the most rewarding of these is ice fishing. It is accessible to young and old alike and the cost to get started can be less than other outdoor winter activities in New York.

New York State Parks has a long tradition of promoting ice fishing events with tournaments at many of their facilities. Northeast of Albany, Grafton Lakes State Park Grafton Lakes State Park has been holding a tournament every winter for the past 33 years. This year’s tournament will be on January 19th and runs from 5 am to 2 pm. There will be prizes for the three longest fish of each species–trout, yellow perch and walleye/chain pickerel–for both the adult and child group. It’s a great day of family fun. Thompson’s Lake at Thacher State Park will be holding their tournament two weeks after Grafton’s on February 2nd. For more information about these tournaments contact the Parks.

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2017 first place brown trout catch at Grafton Lakes State Park.

If learning to ice fish is more up your alley, you can try out Thompson’s Lake on January 19th when DEC’s I Fish NY staff will be on hand to offer a clinic and free day of ice fishing. Moreau Lake State Park’s “Ice Fishing for The Kids” program will be on January 26th from 10 am-2 pm. There will be snacks and refreshments offered by the Friends of Moreau in the warming hut. On February 20th Glimmerglass State Park will host the Otsego Lake Ice Fishing Clinic, also free to the public, from 9 am-3 pm. For more information about these events call the associated park.

There are many other opportunities throughout the season to learn how to ice fish. Governor Cuomo has designated February 16-17th a free fishing weekend as part of his NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative. No fishing license will be required for those partaking over this weekend. Beginning ice anglers are encouraged to download the Ice Fishing Chapter (PDF, 3.7MB) of DEC’s new “I FISH NY Beginners’ Guide to Freshwater Fishing” for information on how to get started ice fishing. Additional information, including a list of waters open to ice fishing, can found on the DEC ice fishing web page and the Public Lakes and Ponds map.

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Crappies are a common ice fishing catch.

When ice fishing, please keep in mind that anyone 17 years and older needs to have a fishing license in their possession (except on designated free fishing weekends). Fishing licenses are valid for 365 days from date of purchase. If using live bait, it must be certified, and excess live bait can never be discarded into a waterbody. This prevents the spread of diseases and invasive species.

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Of utmost importance is safety.  Do not go on ice that is less than 4 inches thick and be especially wary of ice on moving water like streams or rivers. Ask the experts and don’t go alone. Remember that tracks left by others is not an indication of safe ice; conditions can change quickly. Areas near docks and shorelines may be less safe.

If you follow these simple guidelines and dress appropriately, you and your family and friends will be able to enjoy a fun filled day of fishing and fresh air. Always keep in mind that ice fishing is a weather dependent sport and you need to be aware of the conditions. State Parks loves to see pictures of your adventures out on the ice — be sure to share them with staff at your favorite State Park. Happy Fishing!

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Remember to dress for the weather for your fishing adventure.

Staff Favorite Ski Trails

If there is six inches or more of snow on the ground, get those skis ready to hit the trail in a State Park.  Across New York, there are 105 state parks and state historic sites that have cross-country ski trails.  If you are looking to try a new cross-county ski trail, try one of State Parks staff member’s favorite trails.

Nicandri Nature Center staff member Tracy mentions that there are over five miles of trails wind through the woods and along the St. Lawrence River in Robert Moses State Park, Massena, NY. The center offers free ski and snowshoe loans for all ages as well as ski instruction. Post ski, skiers can head into the nature center to enjoy a hot beverage, check out interactive exhibits, and warm up in front of the fire.

State Parks volunteer Judy notes that all of the trails at the Higley Flow State Park  just west of the Adirondacks, have their own unique scenic character and are popular with different ability levels for different reasons. The Overlook Trail is the most heavily used trail at the Park because it is a comfortable length (1.3 miles), relatively flat with a few smaller hills, and passes through a pine and spruce forest.  Skiers are never further than ¾ miles from the Lodge if they want to cut their ski short.  It links with the Woods’ backcountry trail (1.9 miles) and the Warm Brook trail (1.6 miles) for those wishing to challenge themselves further.

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A skier enjoys new snow in Higley Flow State Park.

With over 20 miles of groomed ski trails located in the Art Roscoe Trail system at Allegany State Park in western New York, State Parks staffer Adele finds it hard to pick a favorite, but for a fun fast ski, recommends Christian Hollow.  This 1.5-mile loop starts .7 miles from the trail head. After a mild uphill to get the heart pumping, the trail mellows into a long level area where a skier can find that sweet smooth rhythm – ride and glide, ride and glide- click on this link to learn the ride and glide technique.

A short heart-pounding downhill leads to the well-marked entrance of Christian Hollow. This old logging road rolls past hemlocks, maples, beech and oak. Look for squirrel, mice and deer tracks  and other animal signs along the way.

Although it is marked as an intermediate trail, there is something for everyone. Easy descents lead to short steep uphills where the herringbone or duck-walking technique is key! This video can help you master going uphill on skis.

The reward for the hill climb is a gorgeous view of the Allegany plateau from highest picnic table in the park (2,242 feet). Back in the tracks, the loop continues with a long fast downhill and more rolling terrain with views along the ridge before winding back to Ridge Run. It’s an easy one mile ski back to the trail head. Taking only an hour which includes time for photos and a snack, this trail is exhilarating for both body and soul. Find out more about the trails www.alleganynordic.org.

Minnewaska State Park Preserve, located in the bucolic Hudson Valley, offers over 16 miles/26 kilometers of cross-country ski trails, groomed for both classic and skate skiing.  Skiers of all levels of ability will find a route they can enjoy, with breathtaking clifftop views and scenic carriage roads that meander through pristine forests featuring two sky lakes. You won’t find more picturesque and exciting skiing this close to New York City and Albany anywhere else. State Parks staff member Laura notes that the prices make skiing here affordable for the family, at $10 per adult, $9 per senior and $7 per child.

We have the perfect cure for the winter blues at Fahnestock Winter Park – 20 km of ski trails for beginner to expert extend out in every direction from our lodge.  Fahnestock is the perfect location for your first skiing experience. You can rent you all the gear you need and right out the door of the lodge is our most popular trail the Lake Trail.

Ice conditions permitting, we groom two kilometers of trails on our lake, a perfect place to learn to ski as it is flat and safe. Advanced skiers also love it because they can go fast on the groomed trail.

The trail will take you by a beaver lodge, over the dam built by the Civil Conservation Corps during the Great Depression, and past many small islands. Ice fishermen, skaters and snowshoers can also be found on the lake.

State Parks staff member Declan finds that gliding west towards the sun on a January day is spectacular way to experience the park in winter in a safe environment.

Skiing on the beach in the winter, and then returning to swim at the beach in the summer, is one of the best ways to experience all the seasons in Fahnestock!

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Family fun at Fahnestock Winter Park.