Tag Archives: Taconic State Park

Fall in Love with Autumn Camping

If you think camping in a state park campground is enjoyable in the summer, wait until you experience an overnight getaway in September or early October, when New York’s outdoors is awash in enough colors and sounds of the season to overwhelm the senses.

The autumn mist rising from the water’s surface on a brisk morning, paddling along a tree-lined shore edged in spectacular reds, oranges and golds, the crunch of leaves underfoot on a hike, the aroma of coffee over a crackling fire — these are just a few of the experiences awaiting those campers who prefer to camp once the crowds thin, schools are back in session, and Labor Day is in the rearview mirror.

Benefits to fall camping include fewer neighbors, fewer bugs, and a greater selection of sites from the peak summer season.  With the right clothes and gear, the slightly cooler temperatures make fall camping more comfortable than in the commonly muggy dog days of summer.

Plan to extend a leaf-peeping day trip and sleep under the autumn stars. You can book ahead to reserve a spot or opt for a spontaneous adventure and just grab your gear and go. Many state park campgrounds throughout New York are still open with availability for tent and trailer sites, yurts, cabins, and cottages.

Here are just a few of our fall favorites:

Red House CG, Fall Camping
Listen to the rustling leaves while you camp at Allegany State Park, photo by State Parks.

At 65,000 acres, Allegany State Park is the perfect setting for embracing nature’s colorful palette in the fall months.  Lakes, ponds, and miles of trails, beckon outdoor lovers for hiking, biking, nature walks, fishing, paddling, and more.  Choose from tent and trailer sites, cabins, and cottages.

The Middle Falls At Letchworth State Park
Ballooning at Letchworth State Park, photo by Jim Vallee.

In the Genesee Valley, the sweeping views at Letchworth State Park are jaw-dropping in every season, but add vibrant foliage to the mix and prepare to be amazed by the sheer grandeur.  For campers, the park offers tent and trailer sites and cabins.  Visit the new Humphrey Nature Center or explore the gorge trail on your own — views from Inspiration Point and Middle Falls are a must-see.

Taughannock Falls State Park _DSC_0001
Enjoy the waterfalls at Taughannock Falls State Park, photo by State Parks.

The Finger Lakes gorge parks also provide a stunning backdrop for camping this time of year.  Take a break from campfire cooking and enjoy the bounty of farm-to-table restaurants or the premier wineries in the area. Home to 19 waterfalls, Watkins Glen State Park on Seneca Lake welcomes campers to an array of wooded campsites (many with electric hookups) and rustic cabins.  Walk along the winding paths of the gorge or take a bike ride on the nearby Catharine Valley TrailTaughannock Falls State Park on Cayuga Lake leaves visitors spellbound with its namesake waterfall and rocky cliffs that perch high above the gorge.

Green Lakes (15)
Fall camping with a furry friend at Green Lakes State Park, photo by State Parks.

The only thing more colorful than the fall foliage at Green Lakes State Park is the actual Caribbean-like hues of the glacial lakes themselves.  With campsites nearby including many full-service sites and renovated cabins, campers also have easy access to the park’s 20 miles of hiking trails and championship golf course.

Moreau Fall_0011-12 copy
If you camp at Moreau Lake State Park, take a hike around the lake, photo by State Parks.

Moreau Lake State Park is situated in the foothills of the Adirondacks with tent and trailer sites, cabins and cottages. Hike or bike on the 27 miles of trails and enjoy paddling and fishing on the scenic waters of the park’s beautiful lake or the Hudson River.  Wildlife viewing is a favorite!

Copake Falls Campers_JR2432email
Autumn campers at Taconic State Park, photo by State Parks

Taconic State Park offers autumn campers incredible sites for tents or trailers, cabins and cottages, and plenty to see and do including biking, hiking, fishing, paddling, and more.  As part of the adventure, be sure to check out the Harlem Valley Trail, the South Taconic Trail, Bash Bish Falls, and the Copake Iron Works Museum.

 

Bennington Battle Feild Fall DSC_0122b
Fall colors at Bennington Battlefield State Historic Site, photo by State Parks

Tip:  Whether planning a fall camping adventure or taking a leaf-peeping day-trip, a good resource to determine peak color location is the I Love NY Fall Foliage Report issued weekly.

Early New York Ironworks

The Copake Iron Works was established in 1845 along the Bash Bish Brook near the Massachusetts border by Lemuel Pomeroy (1788-1849).  Pomeroy  was a prosperous businessman from Pittsfield, MA. After operating an iron furnace in nearby Ancram, NY for the Livingston family, and being involved with the New York and Albany Railroad he started the Copake Iron Works. In 1853 he encouraged the New York and Harlem Railroad to expand the rail line to the ironworks and growing hamlet of Copake Falls Ironworks.   Remarkably, the Ironmasters house and some worker housing from this early period are intact today.

Scanned Document
Copake Iron Works, 1888, State Parks image

In 1861, John Beckley of Cannan, CT purchased the Iron Works.  He sold it one year later to Frederick Miles (1815-1896) of Salisbury, CT. Miles elevated the operation to new heights and the Copake Iron Works developed a reputation for producing high quality iron products such as railroad wheels and axles. Miles also replaced the first furnace with the one that is still on site today and being stabilized by the Friends of Taconic State Park. Miles, who served in Congress with future Presidents James Garfield and William McKinley, entrusted the day-to-day operations to his son William A. Miles.  Thanks to William, and with the good fortune of what is still standing at the property, the Copake Iron Works constitutes the largest group of iron-making remnants in the larger tri-state “Iron Heritage” area. In 2016, the Copake Iron Works was designated a Hudson River Valley National Heritage area by the National Parks Service.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Copake Iron Works Museum showcases iron-making artifacts, and some 25 interpretative signs throughout the beautiful natural setting illustrate iron-making operations in great detail.  Friends of Taconic State Park (Friends) supports the activities of the Taconic State Park – Copake Falls Area, with an emphasis on the preservation of the historic Copake Iron Works. The Friends group staff the museum every weekend in season and takes visitors into the blast furnace.

Parking is plentiful for cars and buses and there are also picnic facilities at the museum.  Stop on over for a visit.

Post by Jim Mackin, Friends of Taconic State Park